Your past doesn’t need to define your future

Stolen cash tin becomes new life’s sanctuary.

Typical of nature to redeem the jettisoned spoils of human brokenness.

A cash tin, still with key, is thrown from a passing car but has now been turned into a safe-haven for new life.

Our relationship with nature looks very one-way sometimes.

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Old Fashioned Harvesting at Oldwick Farm

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A27 Chichester. Highways England Scheme

Chichester has a problem: it’s highways network is not designed for the 2016 patterns and volumes of traffic and certainly not designed for the 2019 patterns and volumes of traffic once thousands of new homes are added to the City in the coming years.

In 2004 the Highways Agency saw this problem coming and proposed upgrading the A27. Their public exhibition saw 9234 responses. 6304 people (68%) agreed with the Highways Agency strategy. Then in July 2005 WSCC Councillor M submitted a petition with 2053 signatures asking the Highways Agency to consider a Northern Bypass instead of upgrading the A27.

The Highways Agency considered this option and in their report concluded building a new road to the North of Chichester would not stop the existing A27 needing to be upgraded and therefore the cost alone made this option an uneconomic method of solving Chichester’s traffic problem.

In the end the exercise proved academic as there was currently no money to spend on the A27 at Chichester. However in the meantime Councillor M was promoted to become WSCC Cabinet Member for Highways.

Over the following decade plans emerged for Roads Investment Scheme (RIS) funding. WSCC, in partnership with others, applied for funding to improve the A27. Funds were allocated to a project known as the ‘A27 Chichester Bypass Scheme’ by the then ‘Highways England’.

Highways England began to look at options to solve this problem and considered 1) upgrading the existing A27, 2) building a new bypass to the South, and 3) building a new bypass to the North. When word spread in earl 2016 a northern option was being considered, but before any proposals were officially presented, 4,412 concerned residents and businesses responded to the rumour by signing a petition to express their opposition to a new northern bypass being built around the North of Chichester.

By the time options for the A27 Chichester Bypass Scheme were officially presented in 2017 the northern bypass and southern bypass (new road building) options had been removed. Once again, as in 2004, the options presented to the public were for ‘on-line’ bypass improvements.

Once again Councillor M (who had stood down from his post as Cabinet Member for Highways only months before Highways England were due to present their options) and others began to campaign for a northern bypass to be included in the consultation. As had proved popular in national campaigns for Brexit and US Presidential elections, the campaign in favour of a northern bypass focussed on false allegations of ‘majority against the establishment’. Claiming the establishment was colluding for the benefit of itself and the detriment of the people an aggressive campaign put significant pressure on local politicians to oppose the proposed solutions or else they would be siding with the elite.

No evidence was ever produced to substantiate these claims but that didn’t stop members of the public who had no interest in the A27 wading in with copycat slurs against all and any in authority. Pro-northern bypass campaigners set-up facebook pages (32 followers), twitter accounts (99 followers) and  a petition (3979 signatures). Ultimately the local politicians who hadn’t signed up to this level of pressure and certainly not this level of correspondance decided the easiest solution was to vote for no improvement at all.

The result was a very divided Chichester community, a Secretary of State for transport who didn’t want to be dragged into local politics, and a cancelled investment.

Clearly the Highways professionals know which option their calculations indicate give best value for money and deliver the solution needed. The question remains whether that solution will ever be realised? It’s not a problem the current round of local politicians will have the face. On their watch they have voted to kick the problem down the road. The average age of our current crop of County & District politicians means statistically they won’t be serving when Highways England next bring their proposal to the public for a solution to the A27 at Chichester.

The below video shows countryside to the NW of Chichester. A Northern Bypass for Chichester should only be built through this historic and productive countryside if it significantly resolves a traffic problem to the South of the city.

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Granny says

I know we should never stop learning but there are some things, once learnt, we genuinely feel there can’t be much more to it than what we already know.

Take putting logs on the fire for example. Once the fire is going and needs an additional log presumably we all know the routine: take one log from the log basket, preferably well seasoned unless a suitable green burning wood like Ash, carefully (using a fireproof mit if required) lay log on top of existing flames and ensure resulting burning pile of wood is prevented from rolling apart. Job done.

So imagine my surprise when one day in my late thirties I was adding a couple of logs to the roaring fire to keep Granny warm, only to be challenged on how I was approaching this simple task.

Is there a correct way to load logs into the grate?
Is there a correct way to load logs into the grate?

“Jamie!” (only Granny calls me ‘Jamie’), “not like that, they need to go in upright.”

“Sorry Granny?”, thinking to myself she can’t mean that.

But sure enough, “You should put the logs in the grate vertically, my father always said the logs should be upright in the fire grate. He always did it that way”.

Slightly taken aback, a couple of thoughts flashed through my mind. ‘Quite touching that Granny, some ninety years on, still held so fondly the instructions and example of her father.’ But also, ‘I wonder what he must have been like to live with if he was giving instructions about these sort of details? Especially when opinions on the exact angle a log sat in the fire at were simply a matter of personal preference.’

I’m not sure what you would do in this situation? but I seem to remember I managed, “Oh really.”

I stopped, looked at the fire, thought some more, and looked at Granny. Somewhere in there, I thought a combination of ‘it can’t do too much harm to show willing’, ‘I like the idea of honouring Granny, even if I can’t attach any great reason to why she might be right’ and perhaps there was also a little bit of ‘Great Grandpa was supposed to be quite clever’ and ‘it might be worth a go in case we have possibly lost an ancient skill set with the advent of on tap central heating’.

I’ll save you from any more detail. In case I reveal too much about how my brain works!

But you have probably worked it out already: these days I always load and restock the logs vertically in the fire grate!

Do I understand why? Am I sure this is the better technique? To be honest yes and no.

From observation alone I think, it looks, it feels as if the logs burn cleaner, they burn slower and they give off more heat. In essence it appears the logs loaded into the grate vertically burn noticeably more efficiently.

Can I explain why? Not really. Longer flame possibly? Longer flame = more complete combustion. Maybe?

Will I be telling my grand children that the correct way to load the logs into the grate is vertically? Because my Grandmother had taught me this and her father had taught her? I’m afraid there is a very real risk this fate may not only fall upon my grandchildren!

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A glimpse of life at Sennicotts during WWII

Victor & Mary Willis celebrating their Golden Wedding Anniversary
Victor & Mary Willis celebrating their Golden Wedding Anniversary
Victor & Mary Willis on their wedding day in October 1943
Victor & Mary Willis on their wedding day in October 1943

In the early years of the Second World War a Norfolk girl from Upwell by the name of Kathleen Mary Chapman (W/10633) was posted with the ATS first to the Mitcham Road Barracks in Croydon (1939), before moving further South to Walberton House, West Sussex (1940), then briefly at Fifehead Manor in Hampshire before arriving at Sennicotts in 1941.

What was to happen to Mary at Sennicotts would be life changing.

For in the same year 1615739 Gnr Victor Willis was also stationed at Sennicotts. Home for Victor had been Deptford and Dulwich.

A romance started at Sennicotts that year between Mary and Victor which was to survive being separated by subsequent postings and in October 1943 they were married in Beddington, Croydon.

In 1949 they moved from London to Portsmouth where they were to live for the rest of their lives. They had two sons Doug and Mick and the marriage lasted 55 years. Victor died 12 Feb 1998 aged 81 and Mary died 15 Jan 2011 aged 97.

The photographs below give a flavour of those months Mary spent at Sennicotts.

Our thanks go to Doug and Mick Willis who both researched their parents’s experiences during the war, made contact with us to share their family’s story, and gave us permission to share with you this wonderful piece of Sennicotts’ history. Thank you both.

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Time capsule – sadly empty

a time capsule - if only he had left us the contents
a time capsule – if only he had left us the contents

The joy of undertaking any work at Sennicotts is you never know what you will find.

This week while decorating a bedroom we discovered a builder in the 1960’s had been fuelled by Crosse & Blackwell Meat Soup (Beef). Only he hadn’t just enjoyed the contents but had instead carefully placed the empty tin under an old light shade and built this little time capsule into the base of a cupboard.

Nice to think he thought his workmanship would last long enough for his capsule to be of interest. This one survived over 50 years. Something tells me today’s builders of new homes finished with acres of cheap plastics don’t have quite as much hope in the future of their creations.

A little marketing note aside: Even though I find myself staring at an empty and rusty tin the ‘Ten O’Clock Tested’ logo remains reassuring and inviting. This very successful marketing campaign of the 1950’s and 60’s gave the consumer the guarantee that the product lines they were enjoying had been extensively taste tested at 10 o’clock as part of a daily routine. I find this reassuring to know that Crosse & Blackwell called quite a large number of staff in each morning to join the daily taste test.

That the product was good enough for its staff to consume each morning is somehow a lot more convincing than the image I have of a food plant of today bringing me my tinned soup coldly stared at by a load of computer probes.

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New friends

Thank you Suzi Baldwin and Hollywater Hens for our 8 new friends:

  • 2 x Hybrid Blues
  • 2 x Hybrid Light Sussex
  • 2 x Hybrid Skylines
  • 1 x Pure Breed Wheaten Moran
  • 1 x Pure Breed Hollywater

Our Hollywater Hens getting settled in their Solway Hen Ark while being checked out by the Guinea Fowl

www.hollywaterhens.co.uk

www.solwayrecycling.co.uk

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