Sennicotts as a photographic location

Sennicotts house and gardens are an ideal Georgian, English Country photographic shoot and film location near Chichester in West Sussex.

The house is a Regency Villa (as described by the Connoisseur Magazine in 1967) while the gardens are formal and landscaped including a large walled kitchen garden.

Located 4 miles from Goodwood and within 9 miles of West Wittering beach and Chichester Harbour. 

For more information please contact Eloise via email

Features include:

Barns and agricultural buildings; Entrance hall; Cantilever stairs; Living rooms; Dining room; Kitchen; Bedrooms; Bathrooms; Cellars; Domestic swimming pool; Formal gardens; Parkland; Gatehouse; Fountain; Tarmac road; 3 phase electric supply, 4m ceilings; Oak framed summerhouse.

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Your past doesn’t need to define your future

Stolen cash tin becomes new life’s sanctuary.

Typical of nature to redeem the jettisoned spoils of human brokenness.

A cash tin, still with key, is thrown from a passing car but has now been turned into a safe-haven for new life.

Our relationship with nature looks very one-way sometimes.

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Old Fashioned Harvesting at Oldwick Farm

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Wed 21st June 2017 – NGS

Where else today can you get a cup of the finest single origin Colombian coffees, freshly roasted, for £1.50. Where 100% of the sale price goes to charity and which you can enjoy in 5 acres of private garden surrounded by the scent of roses in the very best weather Europe can produce? Simple answer: Sennicotts near Chichester, open for the National Gardens Scheme from 9:30am to 4pm. Entry £4 for adults. Just to be clear – ALL proceeds go to charity.

Extraordinarily good coffee from Edgcumbes available at Sennicotts for just 3 days
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Sennicotts Gardens – National Gardens Scheme opening 2017

90ae742427fe77c48237812068c39291For three days in 2017 Sennicotts Gardens will be open to the public for the National Gardens Scheme.

Monday 19th June 09:30-16:00
Tuesday 20th June 09:30-16:00
Wednesday 21st June 09:30-16:00

£4 entry per adult. All proceeds will go to charity.

image001This year we are exceptionally excited to be able to offer you freshly roasted, single origin coffee from Edgcumbes. If you haven’t tasted Edgcumbes’ teas and coffees before you are in for a unexpected treat. Once again all proceeds from the sale of tea, coffee and cake will go directly to charity.

If you want to know just how good Edgcumbes coffee is do visit their website www.edgcumbes.co.uk or better still come and visit us and taste for yourself.

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3 men and a lot of poo

No problems keeping warm on this winter's morning
No problems keeping warm on this winter’s morning

Beautiful crisp morning today and we found the perfect job to get stuck into: a manure run.

Four trailer loads getting on for a ton each, loaded and unloaded by hand ensured no one got cold.

We debated the relative benefits of one man and his tele handler vs three men and their forks. The three men won by virtue of the exercise, fresh air, community, tidiness and lower environmental impact.

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Granny says

I know we should never stop learning but there are some things, once learnt, we genuinely feel there can’t be much more to it than what we already know.

Take putting logs on the fire for example. Once the fire is going and needs an additional log presumably we all know the routine: take one log from the log basket, preferably well seasoned unless a suitable green burning wood like Ash, carefully (using a fireproof mit if required) lay log on top of existing flames and ensure resulting burning pile of wood is prevented from rolling apart. Job done.

So imagine my surprise when one day in my late thirties I was adding a couple of logs to the roaring fire to keep Granny warm, only to be challenged on how I was approaching this simple task.

Is there a correct way to load logs into the grate?
Is there a correct way to load logs into the grate?

“Jamie!” (only Granny calls me ‘Jamie’), “not like that, they need to go in upright.”

“Sorry Granny?”, thinking to myself she can’t mean that.

But sure enough, “You should put the logs in the grate vertically, my father always said the logs should be upright in the fire grate. He always did it that way”.

Slightly taken aback, a couple of thoughts flashed through my mind. ‘Quite touching that Granny, some ninety years on, still held so fondly the instructions and example of her father.’ But also, ‘I wonder what he must have been like to live with if he was giving instructions about these sort of details? Especially when opinions on the exact angle a log sat in the fire at were simply a matter of personal preference.’

I’m not sure what you would do in this situation? but I seem to remember I managed, “Oh really.”

I stopped, looked at the fire, thought some more, and looked at Granny. Somewhere in there, I thought a combination of ‘it can’t do too much harm to show willing’, ‘I like the idea of honouring Granny, even if I can’t attach any great reason to why she might be right’ and perhaps there was also a little bit of ‘Great Grandpa was supposed to be quite clever’ and ‘it might be worth a go in case we have possibly lost an ancient skill set with the advent of on tap central heating’.

I’ll save you from any more detail. In case I reveal too much about how my brain works!

But you have probably worked it out already: these days I always load and restock the logs vertically in the fire grate!

Do I understand why? Am I sure this is the better technique? To be honest yes and no.

From observation alone I think, it looks, it feels as if the logs burn cleaner, they burn slower and they give off more heat. In essence it appears the logs loaded into the grate vertically burn noticeably more efficiently.

Can I explain why? Not really. Longer flame possibly? Longer flame = more complete combustion. Maybe?

Will I be telling my grand children that the correct way to load the logs into the grate is vertically? Because my Grandmother had taught me this and her father had taught her? I’m afraid there is a very real risk this fate may not only fall upon my grandchildren!

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